Search Results for: eric Ross music from the future

The Future of Art/Jane Kallir

Modernism is inseparable from the rise of the Western middle class. In nineteenth-century Europe, the bourgeoisie created a vast new market for art, previously a luxury enjoyed mainly by aristocrats. Cities, especially, became cultural hubs replete with museums, galleries, concert halls, theaters and publishing houses. The direct patronage that had characterized the aristocratic age was replaced by a wider distribution system that depended on intermediaries to connect artists with consumers.

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Eric Ross/Music Review

To be honest, I felt a bit intimidated to approach reviewing an album that by all accounts is an important work. I know very little about the Theremin, beyond that it was invented in 1920 and used in songs like the Beach Boys’ “Good Vibrations” and the beautiful and haunting theme for the 1960s’ series “Dark Shadows,” composed by Robert Colbert. The album has received rave reviews from the New York Times and other world class publications. The only thing I can offer are my personal experiences and perceptions listening to the music, to tell why the music was interesting to me…

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Our Back Yard: KNOW Theater/by Chris Kocher

The scene: August 1993. A final dress rehearsal for Tennessee Williams’ “The Night of the Iguana,” the first-ever KNOW Theatre production. The 80-seat performance space behind the organ pipes at Centenary United Methodist Church (now Landmark Church) in Binghamton, New York, proved barely big enough for the vast canvas of the play, but somehow the eight actors in the cast begged, borrowed and got creative in order to build a serviceable set on the 15-by-20-foot stage…

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The name Ragazine was coined in the mid-’70s in Columbus, Ohio, as the title of an alternative newspaper/magazine put together by a group of friends. It was revived in 2004 as ragazine.cc, the on-line magazine of arts, information and entertainment, a collaboration of artists, writers, poets, photographers, travelers and interested others. And that’s what it still is.